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Why is my car smoking under the hood ?



There could be a few reasons why your car is smoking under the hood. One reason might be that your engine is overheating and the smoke is actually steam. Another possibility is that there's an issue with your engine's oil supply, which can cause the engine to overheat and produce smoke. If you're not sure what's causing the smoke, it's best to schedule an appointment with a technician at your nearest Advance Auto Parts.

Precautions to take if your car is smoking under the hood


If you notice that your car is smoking under the hood, there are a few precautions you should take. First, make sure to pull over to a safe spot and turn off your engine. If the smoke is coming from the engine, the engine might be overheating and could start on fire . Leave the hood closed, but turn on your hazard lights. It's also a good idea to call for help at this point so you can be safe while awaiting your tow truck.

Why does my car idle rough when i turn on the ac

What Do the Different Colors (and Smells!) of Smoke Mean?


If you're ever curious about what kind of smoke your car is emitting, take a look at the colors and smells. Here are a few of the most common ones:


  • Blue Smoke: This is usually an indication of oil burning.

  • Green Smoke: This is usually an indication of coolant boiling.

  • White Smoke: This is usually an indication of water vapor.

  • Black Smoke: This is usually an indication of fuel burning.

  • Sulfur Smell: This is usually an indication of a blown head gasket.

If you're ever in doubt, it's always best to have a professional take a look at your car. At Advance Auto Parts, our technicians are trained to handle any issue your car might be experiencing. We're here to help you keep your car running safely and smoothly.

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